Monday, September 12, 2016

ACTIVE AGING


What is active ageing? “Active ageing is the process of optimizing opportunities for health, participation and security in order to enhance quality of life as people age. The goal being to extend peoples healthy life expectancies and quality of life as they get older.”

Active ageing does not just mean physical health, but social, religious, civic and economic as well.

I had some experience with active ageing this past week as I just came back from visiting my parents in Florida. Now, although at 60 years old, I consider my parents young, my dad and I took a few minutes to talk about some concerns he had for my mom and him.

First, he was worried about his balance. He has been doing a lot of reading about how balance decreases as one ages. One thing we talked about was trying out some yoga poses. This doesn’t mean running off to try a yoga class that may at first seem intimidating, but we went over a few basic yoga poses (tree pose, warrior I, and down dog) for him to begin working on. He was amazed at how difficult it was to maintain his balance and how tight he felt in his muscles. But after trying these few simple moves a few times, he already felt more confident in the movement patterns, more flexible into the poses and increased his time he could balance. Starting with a slow yoga flow class is a great way to progress these balance challenges and would also lead into increasing his social circle.

The age of individuals in my parents gated community range from 55 – 90 years old. They come from all over the United States and have had so many different careers! One thing my mom and dad started this “summer” is having a monthly pool party. Unlike my parents, (who are completely enjoying their retirement and go to the pool on a daily basis) many of the residents on their street don’t frequent the pool. But these monthly, themed pool parties were a huge hit! Everyone wanted to be a part of it. They were able to socialize and learn about their past experiences over a simple potluck and some water balloons.

My dad also became a part of his homeowner’s association board. He is the treasurer and attends the regular meetings, taking care of the finances for bills for outside home improvement, social functions, etc. This is a great way for my dad to be an active part of the decision making of his community, and keeps his brain working with maintaining the books!

My mom gets together monthly with the “ladies of the neighborhood” as a social gathering, but they also help put together assistance if a neighbor needs someone to look after their house, a spouse is sick, and organizes day trips to see the sites of Florida.

My parents have done an amazing job staying active physically, socially, and developing their sense of community since they have moved full time to Florida. They definitely give me a goal to aspire to!

So there you go….choose a physical activity you have always wanted to try and give it a go. Get together with some neighbors and organize a fun social event in your city. Attend a community board meeting and see how you can make your neighborhood safer….there are plenty of ways to actively age! Have fun!!
-Jen Bazan, PT, DPT

 


Friday, July 29, 2016

Hydration - July 2016

Hydration

Hot summer months and more activity outside means more sweating and water loss which puts us at risk for dehydration.  Whether you are a high level athlete or simply trying to feel energized and alert throughout the day, staying up on hydration remains very important.  Some potential effects of dehydration include:
·         Dry mouth
·         Sleepiness/tiredness
·         Dry skin
·         Headaches
·         Constipation
·         Dizziness/lightheadedness
·         Muscle cramps
·         Reduced athletic performance
·         Increased risk for injury
Some general guidelines and takeaways in regards to hydration:
·         Don’t wait until you’re thirsty to begin the hydration process, at that point it is too late and you are already dehydrated
·         Begin hydrating throughout the day before time spent outside or a sporting event, do not drink too much fluids immediately before an event as it can cause stomach discomfort
·         Focus on water as primary means for hydration – juices and sports drinks are unnecessary for most and contain high amounts of sugar and calories
o   With that being said, if you are an athlete participating in events lasting longer than 1 hour of intense activity, it may be beneficial to add in some sports drinks
·         A general guideline for how much fluids to consume per day is body weight in pounds, divided by 2, in oz
o   Ex: A 200 lb male would drink 100 oz (200/2 = 100)
·         The best way to determine how much water to drink is by weighing in before and after exercise or sporting events.  This should be done with minimal clothing. For every pound of weight lost replace with 24 oz of fluids
o   Pre-event weight: 200
o   Post-event weight: 197
o   Pounds lost: 3 lbs x 24 oz = 72 oz of fluid replacement
·         Monitor urine output – urination should be frequent throughout the day with no dark yellow or brown color or foul smell
·         Most importantly – listen to your body!  Any unusual symptoms of fatigue, cramping, or dizziness are more severe side effects associated with hydration.  Be proactive and prepare ahead of time, don’t allow these symptoms to arise in the first place.
Stay hydrated!
 - Dave Paczkowski, PT, DPT


Monday, March 14, 2016

National Nutrition Month - March 2016



Welcome to the month of March also known as National Nutrition Month!



 This year the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics has come out with their 2015 Dietary Guidelines. These guidelines act as a way to update Registered Dietitians on the most current nutrition policies and education topics. I would like to share with you one of the newest added recommendations: added sugar. Even as a Registered Dietitian I can’t truthfully say I don’t indulge every now and again on that piece of Dove chocolate, or reach for that piece of pumpkin pie at Thanksgiving, nor would I ever tell my clients not to! The key to nutrition success is moderation!  As a nation 13% of our daily calories are coming from added sugars, and remember added sugars don’t provide any fuel or nutrition to our body…they are purely empty calories. These added sugars are coming from a variety of foods, the more obvious sources are cakes, candy bars, and ice cream but added sugars are hidden in other products like fruit cups packed with syrups, fruit juices that are not 100% juice, refined breads and sports drinks, just to name a few.  These added calories are increase our risk for diabetes and obesity. Let’s all make a pledge to follow the new recommendation and make less than 10% of our calories come from added sugar! Instead of scooping out a bowl of ice cream, puree one frozen banana with one tablespoon of peanut butter for a mock-banana ice cream, or melt 2 tbsp of dark chocolate and drizzle over fresh strawberries. Maybe switch from “fruit drink” to “100% fruit juice”. Swapping out our sugar packed treats for more health conscious ones doesn’t mean we have to sacrifice the flavor! Make the change for a healthier you!


TheraCORE Locations

Inside the Five Seasons Sports Club
6901 S. Madison
Burr Ridge, IL 60527
(630) 590-5409

16622 W. 159th St., Ste. 503
Lockport, IL 60441
(815) 838-5070

350 E. Ogden Ave., Ste. 200
Westmont, IL 60559
(630) 908-7430

www.theracorept.com

https://youtu.be/Uw09QuIu7GY

Tuesday, February 23, 2016

Off-Season Training











The success of an athlete’s season is largely determined through the preparation that is done during the off-season.  This work done during this phase is the base for an athlete’s future success.  You can’t build the second floor of a house before making sure the foundation is as strong as it can be, this is the first step towards a productive season. 

The off-season doesn’t only mean working harder – more hours does not mean more success if the proper program isn’t in place.  A proper off-season program should address the following:

  •           Assessment of fundamental movement patterns: If an athlete cannot perform basic movements due to mobility or stability issues, the athlete has a big cap on athletic potential.  Good movement is the foundation for optimal athletic success.
  •          Addressing areas of limited mobility: The more we sit as a society the more ‘tight’ muscles we develop.  These mobility limitations prevent the body from moving as it is designed to
  •          Addressing common strength and stability limitations: When the mobility limitations are coupled with strength limitations, an athlete’s performance will greatly suffer until these are resolved. The combination of mobility and stability limitations result in large decreases of power output, speed, and put athletes at a higher risk to be sidelined from injury.
  •          Proper progression: It is important that an off-season program does not progress too quickly or too slowly, as these can both limit progress made during the off-season and increase the risk of injury.
  •          Preparing the body for the demands of a specific sport: There is no one size fits all approach for training.  Each sport has different physical requirements, so each sport should not be trained the same way.


Does your off-season training program address each of these key areas?  For more information on how this would be customized for your team’s needs, contact TheraCORE about our off-season training plans run by physical therapists.  Put the time in now to set yourself up for success later.

- Dave Paczkoski, PT, DPT


TheraCORE Locations

Inside the Five Seasons Sports Club
6901 S. Madison
Burr Ridge, IL 60527
(630) 590-5409

16622 W. 159th St., Ste. 503
Lockport, IL 60441
(815) 838-5070

350 E. Ogden Ave., Ste. 200
Westmont, IL 60559
(630) 908-7430

www.theracorept.com
https://youtu.be/Uw09QuIu7GY

Friday, January 29, 2016

Accomplishing Your New Year’s Health Resolutions








Accomplishing Your New Year’s Health Resolutions

Have you had troubles accomplishing your New Year’s resolutions? Studies show that by midyear, less than half had kept their January promises. With the right attitude and approach, you can improve your own odds. Here are the most successful approaches for accomplishing your New Years Resolutions.
1.      Create S.M.A.R.T. Goals. Specific, Measurable, Attainable, Relevant, Timely. Big-scale goals can frustrate you and may make you give up. Break them down into several smaller, easier ones. And list the steps for each. To lose 1 pound a week, you could try replacing dessert with fruit, for example.
2.      Share your goals with others. It’s best not to keep your goals to yourself. To improve your physical fitness, finding a workout buddy or hiring a personal trainer will hold you accountable with others. Tell a friend or family member about your plan. Having support can help keep you on track.
3.      Chart your progress. Keep track of how you are doing. People who do are more likely to succeed.
4.      Tackle one goal at a time. It’s tough to change too many things at once. It takes time to form bad habits, but it also takes time to replace them with good ones. Conquer one habit, then move on to the next
5.      Do not let one slip up derail you. Everyone has lapses when trying to build a healthy habit. It doesn’t mean you’ve failed. Forgive yourself for dropping the ball. Use it as a chance to learn what triggered you. If being around friends who are smoking when you’re trying to quit, you are more likely to lapse. Do your best to avoid those situations. Learn from your mistakes, and move on.
6.      Reward yourself. Rewards, however small, can motivate you. They remind you of your progress and make things more fun. For short-term goals, rewards should be simple, like going to a movie, getting a manicure, or buying a pair of shoes. Give yourself larger rewards for reaching bigger goals, like taking a vacation.



Zachary M. Schneider

Certified Personal Trainer (CPT), Corrective Exercise Specialist (CES)

Thursday, December 31, 2015

How to survive winter running


Running through the colder months can be intimidating, especially when the ground is covered in snow. Winter running could actually make you a stronger runner, even improving spring race times. Unlike the warmer seasons, your body temperature will not increase as quickly, so energy will not be wasted on cooling the body down. This leaves more energy for longer runs, or a faster pace.
It is important to get use to running in colder conditions if you have a race planned for early spring. Chicago winters are known for lasting well into March and April, the start of race season. Muscles need to adapt to the cold, just like they adapt to the heat in summer. It is not uncommon for it to be snowing the day of the Shamrock Shuffle.
You can also think of winter running as one big dress rehearsal for race day. Play with layering your clothes to figure out what works for you. One good rule of thumb to follow, always dress for 20-30 degrees warmer than what the actual temperature is. Over dressing is a mistake I have seen runners make too often. This leads to overheating and your muscles will fatigue quicker. I have run comfortably in conditions below 0 degrees by dressing correctly. For very cold conditions, wearing a scarf around your mouth will help warm the air and avoid irritating your airway. You want to wear moisture wicking material, especially for your base layer to avoid retaining sweat. If your clothes become wet from sweating, the sweat will eventually begin to freeze, and no one wants to wear layers of wet clothing. Wool socks are a great way to keep your feet warm and dry, and sports brands make wool socks that will prevent blisters and wick moisture. Investing in a good pair of running pants is well worth the money. Clothing technology has improved and you won’t have to worry about layer your bottom half.
One question asked often is what type of shoes to wear if it snows. I have always just worn my regular running shoes. There are different gadgets on the market that can be used to prevent slipping. The majority of them slip over the sole of the shoe and help create traction, think of a chain on a tire. Some runners I know swear by running in a trail shoe. The sole of a trail shoe is made differently, also increasing the amount of traction to reduce slipping.
The last, and most important thing I have to say about winter running is do not forget to hydrate. It may be cold out and you might think that you are not sweating as much, but your body is still working. Proper hydration before, during, and after runs will help the muscles recover quickly for your next run.  For runs shorter than 45 minutes, drinking 1-2 8 ounce glasses of water within the hour prior should be sufficient. Over 45 minutes, try to consume 8 ounces during your run. Longer than an hour, drink water every 45 minutes.
That being said, this winter’s weather has been wonderful, so lace up your shoes and get out and enjoy it!

Heather Finnegan, PT, DPT 

TheraCORE Locations

Inside the Five Seasons Sports Club
6901 S. Madison
Burr Ridge, IL 60527
(630) 590-5409

16622 W. 159th St., Ste. 503
Lockport, IL 60441
(815) 838-5070

350 E. Ogden Ave., Ste. 200
Westmont, IL 60559
(630) 908-7430

www.theracorept.com
https://youtu.be/Uw09QuIu7GY

Friday, December 18, 2015

Prepping for Winter

Prepping for Winter

I can’t believe Christmas is two weeks away!! Wasn’t it just summer? My husband can tell Christmas is coming by the daily ringing of the doorbell with good ol UPS dropping off soon to be Christmas presents for family and friends (online shopping is a god send!).
The other day I went into the closet to begin opening the boxes, tallying who I have left to shop for, and begin my wrapping. A half hour went by and I could already feel my neck and upper back stiffening up from leaning over the boxes. This led me to thinking……I do everything in front of me. Carrying boxes, wrapping presents, laundry, texting, driving, picking up the girls, treating patients….. I am constantly leaning forward and this is putting increased strain on my neck and low back. Not to mention, the holidays can be stressful! Getting the house ready for my parents visit, wanting to make sure I have the perfect gift for everyone. Planning holiday dinners and constantly on the go…. No wonder I have a million trigger points in my shoulders!! Does this sound familiar?

So I am resolving to do something different this winter. As I have blogged about before, I love running and that is usually my go to form of exercise and stress relief. But as the weather begins to get chilly I am going to change things up and you should too! Choose three of your regular work out days to add in some posture exercises. Here is my plan:

Day 1: Foam roll pec stretch or doorway pec stretch

 

Day 2: Standing rows and thoracic extensions



Day 3: Low lunge with rotation and tree pose

        

   
Perform these exercises for a minute of time for each set. A continuing education course I recently attended reminded me on the importance of training our muscles for endurance type of activities. Holding good posture is an all-day event! So work on low resistance of these exercises, but increasing your time performing them (work up to performing for 5 minutes at a time!).
Incorporating these simple exercises into my daily routine will help me decrease the strain on my neck and shoulders and help me stand a little taller this winter. (But you better believe I will still be asking for that massage gift certificate forChristmas!!).

Happy Holidays!!


TheraCORE Physical Therapy Locations

Five Seasons Family Sports Club
6901 S. Madison
Burr Ridge, IL 60527
630.590-.409

16622 W. 159th St., Ste. 503
Lockport, IL 60441
815.838.5070

350 E. Ogden Ave., Ste. 200
Westmont, IL 60559
630.908.7430